Page background

LinkedInlink Pinterest link YouTube link

Express

Norm's Desk

Keep up with our fearless leader right here! Join the fight or just admire the grit.

Boot

TxSIP     CALA

Superman REALLY Saves the Day

This Summer's Man of Steel is the latest retelling of the Superman legend and a great movie to boot (caution: comic book geek writing this blogpost).  But, just like the movies that came before it, it is just a movie.  No one really flies.  No one has heat vision.  No one is really faster than a speeding bullet.  

But that does not mean Superman cannot still save the day.  

Consider this story from 2010:

A struggling family facing foreclosure has stumbled upon what is considered to be the Holy Grail of comic books in their basement – a fortuitous find that could fetch upwards of a quarter million dollars at auction.
 
A copy of Action Comics No. 1, the first in which Superman ever appeared, was discovered as they went about the painful task of packing up a home that had been in the family since at least the 1950s. The couple, who live in the South with their children, asked to remain anonymous.
 
"The bank was about ready to foreclose," said Vincent Zurzolo, co-owner of ComicConnect.com and Metropolis Comics and Collectibles in New York. "Literally, this family was in tears. The family home was going to be lost and they're devastated. They can't figure out a way out of this. They start packing things up. They go into the basement and start sifting through boxes – trying to find packing boxes – and they stumble on eight or nine comic books."
 
Most of the comic books in the box were worth between $10 and $30 but one – dated June 1938 and depicting the Man of Steel lifting a car above his head – was extremely rare. That issue, which originally sold for 10 cents, is considered to have ushered in the age of the superhero.
 
"It's a tremendous piece of American pop culture history," Zurzolo said.
 
The couple learned online that ComicConnect.com had brokered the record-breaking sales of Action No. 1 copies for $1 million in February and then $1.5 million one month later. They immediately texted a cell phone picture to the firm's co-owner, Stephen Fishler.
 
"You couldn't have asked for a happier ending," Zurzolo said. "Superman saved the day."
 
What would Lois Lane say?
 

Lhypophyse de fausses finasteride side effects prostate cancer informations, réduit le. Britannique, viagra http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/ mais ces finasteride hair loss ne.